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Editorials

US Jesuits call Dakota Access Pipeline decision “morally unacceptable”

28 February 2017
“Herein lies a major point of contention between the reservation and the pipeline companies.  The Indigenous Peoples have a great reverence for the land and the water.  They know that a reasonable quality of life is impossible without clean water and properly managed land.  The same Indigenous Peoples have witnessed the destruction that the oil and gas industry has done since the very first wells were drilled.” (From “A Special Report on the Dakota Access Pipeline at Standing Rock,” The Millennium Report, 29 October 2016). Photo credit: themillenniumreport.com

The US and Canada Provinces of the Society of Jesus wish to share with Ecojesuit their recent commentary on the decision by the US Army Corps of Engineers  to grant the final easement allowing the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL)  to be built under the Missouri River in North Dakota, USA, and doing away with the environmental review process that was initiated in the previous administration. This is their statement titled US Jesuits, Red Cloud Indian School and St. Francis Mission Call Dakota Access Pipeline Decision “Morally Unacceptable”: “The Jesuits of the US, together with the Red Cloud Indian School on the Pine Ridge Reservation and Saint Francis Mission on the Rosebud Reservation, are deeply concerned by the recent decision of the US Army Corps of Engineers concerning the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL).  The decision to issue an easement allowing the pipeline to cross under the Missouri River north of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation is a direct response to President Trump’s 24 January memorandum urging the Army Corps to expedite the review and approval process. “Suspending the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) process previously ordered by the Obama Administration, which would have determined the safety, environmental and climate impacts of the
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Asia Pacific Jesuits in the time of Laudato si’

31 January 2017
2017_01_31_Editorial_Photo1

Pedro Walpole, SJ Jesuit Conference Asia Pacific (JCAP) established Reconciliation with Creation, a comprehensive program that aims to enable greater environmental awareness and participation in caring for all forms of life.  As part of this program, Jesuit pastoral ministries with the poor and beyond are integrating social and ecological objectives. Meanwhile, Jesuit schools are embarking upon a new learning curve with many new social engagements and technologies that may enact greater ecological integration and accountability.  Likewise, as part of this initiative, Jesuit communities themselves are learning to audit their consumption and waste. Climatic events, as those that have devastated many different communities that this conference represents, are currently the focus of many Jesuit institutions as they seek to develop protocol beyond relief to disaster risk reduction.  To address this urgent challenge, sustainability science needs to adapt so that it becomes problem-focused, and a critical element in this endeavor is the capacity of Jesuit institutes to network and collaborate with others. Grounded in gratitude and engaging with hope, Reconciliation with Creation is essentially an invitation to act that concurrently seeks to gradually deepen the experience of the sacred. The Asia Pacific context The movement for environmental research and ecological action across
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Reflections

A view of the Earth at night as seen from space, revealing city lights, gas flares, wildfires and other nighttime lights. Image was captured in April and October 2012 by a sensor aboard NOAA’s Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership Satellite. Photo credit:blog.education.nationalgeographic.com.

A Lenten prayer guide for protectors of Mother Earth

Columban Center for Advocacy and Outreach and the Sisters of Mercy of the Americas’ Institute Justice Team Traditionally, Lent is a time of prayer, fasting and almsgiving.  It is a journey of faith, preparing us for Holy Week and Easter.  It lasts 40 days, recalling Israel’s 40 years in the wilderness and Jesus’ 40...

Los 17 Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible ilustrados por la Agencia Católica para el Desarrollo de Ultramar (CAFOD), que ha abogado por nuevos objetivos globales de desarrollo ya que sus socios compartieron que estos son “importantes para el trabajo que hacen con las comunidades de todo el mundo.” Foto de: cafod.org.uk

The community and ascetic dimensions of Christian ecological commitment

Jaime Tatay Nieto, SJ Many continue to examine the motivating factors behind the promulgation of Laudato si’ (LS), the first “ecological” encyclical in the history of Church social teaching.  The subject of LS goes far beyond the Catholic community and concerns every person who believes in a God who can act out of love,...

News and Programs

Inspiring sustainable lifestyles through the lens

Wishing to contribute to building a strong narrative for deep individual and collective changes,...

Struggling for climate justice in our common home

Climate justice as human justice is the main theme of Loyola University Chicago’s fourth...