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El Niño 2019 + Climate Change

31 January 2019
The new norms of cold and warm extremes

by Pedro Walpole SJ With the heat of the Australian summer in the southern hemisphere and the freezing in North America by the polar vortex, 2019 begins with the extremes. For those in the tropics, especially the west Pacific, there is a need to be watching the east Pacific 3.4 zone to understand the emerging...
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Understanding forests and droughts in Asia Pacific

15 December 2015
Les incendies de forêt en Indonésie depuis Juillet de cette année ont détruit environ 1,7 millions d’hectares de forêts et de terrains ouverts, une activité annuelle dévastatrice prises pour préparer les terres pour les plantations à grande échelle et aggravés par la forte phénomène El Niño de cette année qui fournit des conditions plus sèches. Crédit photo: foodpolicyforthought.com

Kumiko Kubo and Rowena Soriaga Drought is a creeping disaster, slow to begin and almost as slow to end and both its onset and termination are difficult to identify. For people who deeply rely on natural resources for a living, the cumulative effects of disasters can be devastating. Farmers living in or near forests...
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10 things about El Niño 2014: Downgraded as a minor event but response needs to be upgraded

15 September 2014
2014_09_15_Editorial_featured_photo

Pedro Walpole El Niño is a weather changer for much of the world. As we understand a little more of this phenomenon that begins in the tropical Pacific Ocean but reaches all continents through changes in the atmosphere and jet stream, we are learning to adapt. El Niño was declared earlier this year and...
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Sea-level rise in the Philippines: ENSO and monsoon influences

31 May 2012
El tifón Muifa y la tormenta tropical Nock-ten sopló en las Filipinas, agosto de 2011. Foto de: NOAA

(Second of three parts) Wendy Clavano, PhD As the Earth rotates around the sun and energy is moved from the equator poleward, the ocean-atmosphere system responds by creating currents in the ocean where in places are large enough to be essentially permanent.  As the trade winds blow westward just above the equator, water is...
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Western Pacific heading for rough weather and increased landslide risk

15 August 2010
Satellite image of Typhoon Morakot (Typhoon Kiko in the Philippines), August 2009

Last 22-25 June 2010, nearly a thousand scientists gathered at the Taipei International Conference Center to discuss the current understanding about the factors that induce such extreme events. Recent findings from the work of around 4,000 scholars were presented at the Western Pacific Geophysics Meeting (http://www.agu.org/meetings/wp10/) in Taipei in the desire to understand...
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